Runway show is a reflection of fashion trend and a designer's thought. For designer like Vivienne Westwood, runway shows are a platform for her voice on politics and current events. For her AW15 menswear show, according to Water,[42] "where models with severely bruised faces channeled eco-warriors on a mission to save the planet." Another recent example is a staged feminist protest march for Chanel's SS15 show, rioting models chanting words of empowerment with signs like "Feminist but feminine" and "Ladies first." According to Water,[42] "The show tapped into Chanel's long history of championing female independence: founder Coco Chanel was a trailblazer for liberating the female body in the post-WWI era, introducing silhouettes that countered the restrictive corsets then in favour."
At the beginning of the 20th century, fashion magazines began to include photographs of various fashion designs and became even more influential than in the past.[50] In cities throughout the world these magazines were greatly sought after and had a profound effect on public taste in clothing. Talented illustrators drew exquisite fashion plates for the publications which covered the most recent developments in fashion and beauty. Perhaps the most famous of these magazines was La Gazette du Bon Ton, which was founded in 1912 by Lucien Vogel and regularly published until 1925 (with the exception of the war years).[51]
These levels consist of many separate but interdependent sectors. These sectors are Textile Design and Production, Fashion Design and Manufacturing, Fashion Retailing, Marketing and Merchandising, Fashion Shows, and Media and Marketing. Each sector is devoted to the goal of satisfying consumer demand for apparel under conditions that enable participants in the industry to operate at a profit.[32]
The Black Panther Party (BPP) was an essential piece of the Black Power movement that allowed members that were involved advocate for the African American race in different subjects like equality and politics. The BPP members wore a very distinctive uniform: a black leather jacket, black pants, light blue shirts, a black beret, an afro, dark sunglasses, and usually a fist in the air.[88] Their image gave off a very militant like feel to it. This notable uniform was established in 1996, but a different uniform was still in place before; just the sunglasses and leather jackets.[88] Each member wore this uniform at events, rallies, and in their day-today life. Very few members changed the essential parts of the outfit, but some added personal touches such as necklaces or other jewelry that was usually were a part of African culture.[87] The Black Panther uniform did succeeded in intimidating enemies and onlookers and clearly sent a message of black pride and power even though the initial intention of this party was to communicate solidarity among the Black Panther Party members.[88]

Suggestion: This post talks about the difference between being thin and being anorexic, about how we should reevaluate what “healthy” body image means. Saying “Thin & Proud” may ruffle feathers, even if all women should be proud of their figures. I would focus on examples of how the press/media/culture is confusing anorexia with natural thinness, and reflect that in the post title.
Why you should follow: High fashion can sometimes seem like it's out of reach. While the likes of Chanel and Gucci will always hold a place in our hearts (and most bloggers' closets), sometimes it's great to know how to shop without spending a fortune. Alex Stedman of The Frugality constantly proves that the high street offers incredible pieces that look super expensive (such as this jumper from M&S).
Make sure your beauty blog name is clear to spell: I have seen many blog names that just make it impossible to pronounce them loud. Or if called out loud it will cause a confusion.For example, my own blog name is DigitalGYD.com which I chose because the name I wanted (DigitalGuide.com) was already taken. Now I regret because this name neither suits my now content and is hard for people to understand when called out loud (often misunderstood with DigitalGuide or Digital Geed). *FacePalm*
Susie Lau's Style Bubble has been going for over a decade and includes intelligent articles on everything from underground global fashion talent to perfume. She also provides fascinating behind-the-scenes pieces on the real work it takes to create a beautiful Chanel garment. Then there's the tongue-in-cheek Man Repeller run by Leandra Medine and her team. Its smart, witty take on fashion is refreshing. And if over-the-top clothes aren't your thing, we've also found plenty of bloggers with more pared-back styles for the minimalists. 
Why: Of Turkish/Iranian Jewish descent, Medine kicked off her career with a blog called Boogers + Bagels. Her ironic fashion-addict asides soon had her readers rolling in the aisles, and she decided to focus on the topic full-time after a joky conversation while out shopping with a friend about how ‘man-repelling’ all the fashion-forward outfits they loved were. It’s now a male-scaring empire, providing in-depth intel: ‘The difference between Mom Jeans and Dad Jeans’, the fabulous ‘Manstagram’ – all the best fash items du jour – and fun features and style news aplenty.
Furthermore, political revolution also made much impact on the fashion trend. For example, during the 1960s the economy had become wealthier, divorce rate was increasing and government approved the birth control pill. This revolution inspired younger generation to rebellion. In 1964, the leg-baring miniskirt has become a major fashion trend of the 1960s. Given that fashion designers began to experiment with the shapes of garment, loose sleeveless, micro-minis, flared skirts, and trumpet sleeves. In this case, mini-skirt trend became an icon of the 1960s.
At the beginning of the 20th century, fashion magazines began to include photographs of various fashion designs and became even more influential than in the past.[50] In cities throughout the world these magazines were greatly sought after and had a profound effect on public taste in clothing. Talented illustrators drew exquisite fashion plates for the publications which covered the most recent developments in fashion and beauty. Perhaps the most famous of these magazines was La Gazette du Bon Ton, which was founded in 1912 by Lucien Vogel and regularly published until 1925 (with the exception of the war years).[51]
Military technology has played an important role in the fashion industry. The camouflage pattern in clothing was developed to help military personnel be less visible to enemy forces. A trend emerged in the 1960s and camouflage fabric was introduced to street wear. The camouflage fabric trend disappeared and resurfaced several times since then. Camouflage started to appear in high fashion by the 1990s.[39] Designers such as Valentino, Dior and Dolce & Gabbana combined camouflage into their runway and ready-to-wear collections.
Though different textile colors and patterns changed from year to year,[20] the cut of a gentleman's coat and the length of his waistcoat, or the pattern to which a lady's dress was cut, changed more slowly. Men's fashions were largely derived from military models, and changes in a European male silhouette were galvanized in theaters of European war where gentleman officers had opportunities to make notes of foreign styles such as the "Steinkirk" cravat or necktie.
With increasing environmental awareness, the economic imperative to "Spend now, think later" is getting increasingly scrutinized.[43] Today's consumer tends to be more mindful about consumption, looking for just enough and better, more durable options. People have also become more conscious of the impact their everyday consumption has on the environment and society, and these initiatives are often described as a move towards sustainable fashion, yet critics argue a circular economy based on growth is an oxymoron, or an increasing spiral of consumption, rather than a utopian cradle-to-cradle circular solution.
in fashion popular, trendy (Brit. informal), all the rage, hip (slang), in (informal), latest, the new, happening (informal), current, modern, cool (slang), with it (informal), usual, smart, prevailing, fashionable, stylish, chic, up-to-date, customary, genteel, in vogue, up-to-the-minute, modish, du jour (French), à la mode, voguish (informal), trendsetting, all the go (informal), culty That sort of dress is in fashion again.
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