Why you should follow: High fashion can sometimes seem like it's out of reach. While the likes of Chanel and Gucci will always hold a place in our hearts (and most bloggers' closets), sometimes it's great to know how to shop without spending a fortune. Alex Stedman of The Frugality constantly proves that the high street offers incredible pieces that look super expensive (such as this jumper from M&S).
Internet technology such as online retailers and social media platforms have given way for trends to be identified, marketed and sold immediately.[36] Styles and trends are easily conveyed online to attract the trendsetters. Posts on Instagram or Facebook can easily increase awareness about new trends in fashion, which subsequently may create high demand for specific items or brands,[37] new "buy now button" technology can link these styles with direct sales.
The beginning in Europe of continual and increasingly rapid change in clothing styles can be fairly reliably dated. Historians, including James Laver and Fernand Braudel, date the start of Western fashion in clothing to the middle of the 14th century,[12][13] though they tend to rely heavily on contemporary imagery[14] and illuminated manuscripts were not common before the fourteenth century.[15] The most dramatic early change in fashion was a sudden drastic shortening and tightening of the male over-garment from calf-length to barely covering the buttocks,[16] sometimes accompanied with stuffing in the chest to make it look bigger.
The pace of change accelerated considerably in the following century, and women and men's fashion, especially in the dressing and adorning of the hair, became equally complex. Art historians are therefore able to use fashion with confidence and precision to date images, often to within five years, particularly in the case of images from the 15th century. Initially, changes in fashion led to a fragmentation across the upper classes of Europe of what had previously been a very similar style of dressing and the subsequent development of distinctive national styles. These national styles remained very different until a counter-movement in the 17th to 18th centuries imposed similar styles once again, mostly originating from Ancien Régime France.[17] Though the rich usually led fashion, the increasing affluence of early modern Europe led to the bourgeoisie and even peasants following trends at a distance, but still uncomfortably close for the elites – a factor that Fernand Braudel regards as one of the main motors of changing fashion.[18]
Although tailors and dressmakers were no doubt responsible for many innovations, and the textile industry certainly led many trends, the history of fashion design is normally understood to date from 1858 when the English-born Charles Frederick Worth opened the first true haute couture house in Paris. These fashion houses have to adhere to standards such as keeping at least twenty employees engaged in making the clothes, showing two collections per year at fashion shows, and presenting a certain number of patterns to costumers.[23] Since then, the idea of the fashion designer as a celebrity in his or her own right has become increasingly dominant.[24]
The notion of global fashion industry is a product of the modern age.[29] Prior to the mid-19th century, most clothing was custom-made. It was handmade for individuals, either as home production or on order from dressmakers and tailors. By the beginning of the 20th century—with the rise of new technologies such as the sewing machine, the rise of global capitalism and the development of the factory system of production, and the proliferation of retail outlets such as department stores—clothing had increasingly come to be mass-produced in standard sizes and sold at fixed prices.

Early Western travelers, traveling whether to India, Persia, Turkey or China, would frequently remark on the absence of change in fashion in those countries. The Japanese shōgun's secretary bragged (not completely accurately) to a Spanish visitor in 1609 that Japanese clothing had not changed in over a thousand years.[6] However, there is considerable evidence in Ming China of rapidly changing fashions in Chinese clothing.[7] Changes in costume often took place at times of economic or social change, as occurred in ancient Rome and the medieval Caliphate, followed by a long period without major changes. In 8th-century Moorish Spain, the musician Ziryab introduced to Córdoba[8][unreliable source][9] sophisticated clothing-styles based on seasonal and daily fashions from his native Baghdad, modified by his own inspiration. Similar changes in fashion occurred in the 11th century in the Middle East following the arrival of the Turks, who introduced clothing styles from Central Asia and the Far East.[10]


Why: Hailing from Sao Paulo, Helena Bordon is one of Brazil’s most influential style bloggers. She started her fashion education from a young age courtesy of her mother, Donata Meirelles, the style director of Vogue Brazil. When Helena was just 7 years old, she’d join her mum at all the top fashion shows and eventually interned at Valentino. Now, Helena is co-founder of Brazilian high street fashion chain 284, as well as finding the time to run her eponymous blog, helenabordon.com, which offers Helena’s insider style, travel and beauty tips. Disclaimer: expect holiday envy.

The media plays a significant role when it comes to fashion. For instance, an important part of fashion is fashion journalism. Editorial critique, guidelines, and commentary can be found on television and in magazines, newspapers, fashion websites, social networks, and fashion blogs. In recent years, fashion blogging and YouTube videos have become a major outlet for spreading trends and fashion tips, creating an online culture of sharing one's style on a website or Instagram account. Through these media outlets readers and viewers all over the world can learn about fashion, making it very accessible.[49]
Why: Of Turkish/Iranian Jewish descent, Medine kicked off her career with a blog called Boogers + Bagels. Her ironic fashion-addict asides soon had her readers rolling in the aisles, and she decided to focus on the topic full-time after a joky conversation while out shopping with a friend about how ‘man-repelling’ all the fashion-forward outfits they loved were. It’s now a male-scaring empire, providing in-depth intel: ‘The difference between Mom Jeans and Dad Jeans’, the fabulous ‘Manstagram’ – all the best fash items du jour – and fun features and style news aplenty.
The post title: “Buy It Now! Clothes Featured on The Carrie Diaries”  has a few key points in the title to make you want to click. If you're a Carrie Diaries fan, you want to know what she is wearing, and how to buy it. I liked the “Buy It Now!” portion, as it's a call to action, surpisingly I did not see one so blatant in the submissions. It's effective in catching your attention.
I absolutely love scrolling through those #ootd posts, but I’ll be honest with you- fashion blogs that post outfit posts only are not that interesting to me, I prefer fashion blogs that provide various views and topics towards fashion. I understand how this can be difficult to achieve, but I believe that every blog should have a purpose and you should try your best in order to bring more valuable content to your readers.
Even though they are often used together, the term fashion differs from clothes and costume, where the first describes the material and technical garment, whereas the second has been relegated to special senses like fancy-dress or masquerade wear. Fashion instead describes the social and temporal system that "activates" dress as a social signifier in a certain time and context. Philosopher Georgio Agamben connects fashion to the current intensity of the qualitative moment, to the temporal aspect the Greek called kairos, whereas clothes belong to the quantitative, to what the Greek called chronos.[4]
The Black Panther Party (BPP) was an essential piece of the Black Power movement that allowed members that were involved advocate for the African American race in different subjects like equality and politics. The BPP members wore a very distinctive uniform: a black leather jacket, black pants, light blue shirts, a black beret, an afro, dark sunglasses, and usually a fist in the air.[88] Their image gave off a very militant like feel to it. This notable uniform was established in 1996, but a different uniform was still in place before; just the sunglasses and leather jackets.[88] Each member wore this uniform at events, rallies, and in their day-today life. Very few members changed the essential parts of the outfit, but some added personal touches such as necklaces or other jewelry that was usually were a part of African culture.[87] The Black Panther uniform did succeeded in intimidating enemies and onlookers and clearly sent a message of black pride and power even though the initial intention of this party was to communicate solidarity among the Black Panther Party members.[88]
Great Post, I chose to focus on the crowdfunding niche. It was a 2 billion dollar industry last year and is projected to be a 5 billion dollar industry this year. I recommend using Fiverr to use graphic designers for first time bloggers. I did use the logo designed for five dollars at the top of my site (bottom now) but stopped using it because it didn’t look good on mobile.
Kathleen’s blog was created out of the realization that post-grad life wasn’t as fabulous as Carrie Bradshaw had led her to believe (even as adults, we’re still trying to solve the puzzle of how Carrie could afford a closet-full of Manolos on a writer’s salary). But looking at her inspiring outfits and picture-perfect lifestyle, you might have to disagree that it is extremely fabulous (except she pulls it all off with affordable pieces and doable outfit ideas).
Often consumers need to be told what they want. Fashion companies have to do their research to ensure they know their customers' needs before developing solutions. Steve Jobs said, "You’ve got to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology. You cannot start with the technology and try to figure out where you are going to sell it".[47]
Why: Of Turkish/Iranian Jewish descent, Medine kicked off her career with a blog called Boogers + Bagels. Her ironic fashion-addict asides soon had her readers rolling in the aisles, and she decided to focus on the topic full-time after a joky conversation while out shopping with a friend about how ‘man-repelling’ all the fashion-forward outfits they loved were. It’s now a male-scaring empire, providing in-depth intel: ‘The difference between Mom Jeans and Dad Jeans’, the fabulous ‘Manstagram’ – all the best fash items du jour – and fun features and style news aplenty.
Although aspects of fashion can be feminine or masculine, some trends are androgynous.[25] The idea of unisex dressing originated in the 1960s when designers such as Pierre Cardin and Rudi Gernreich created garments, such as stretch jersey tunics or leggings, meant to be worn by both males and females. The impact of unisex expands more broadly to encompass various themes in fashion including androgyny, mass-market retail, and conceptual clothing.[26] The fashion trends of the 1970s, such as sheepskin jackets, flight jackets, duffel coats, and unstructured clothing influenced men to attend social gatherings without a tuxedo jacket and to accessorize in new ways. Some men's styles blended the sensuality and expressiveness despite the conservative trend, the growing gay-rights movement and an emphasis on youth allowed for a new freedom to experiment with style, fabrics such as wool crepe, which had previously been associated with women's attire was used by designers when creating male clothing.[27]

Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…
Indeed, for the master bath, Sui chased down poppy-​patterned tiles from a company in New Zealand; a shower curtain was fashioned out of black lace sample fabric left over from one of her collections. — Vanessa Lawrence, ELLE Decor, "Tour Anna Sui’s Stunning Greenwich Village Apartment," 7 Aug. 2019 Particles of moon rock were fashioned onto plaques that included the flag of the recipient country or U.S. state and delivered in the early 1970s. — Dallas News, "How Ross Perot put up $5 million so U.S. agents could stage a sting to recover a stolen moon rock," 14 July 2019 When the home was first built, its rooms were fashioned with only a handful of windows, all quite small, in the name of keeping in heat during the cold months. — Samantha Weiss Hills, Curbed, "Entrepreneur, and beekeeper, Claire Marin opens the door to her home near New York’s Catskill Mountains," 8 July 2019 The wooden statue was fashioned out of a tree with a chain saw by a local folk artist, Ales Zupevc, known as Max. — Palko Karasz, BostonGlobe.com, "Melania Trump gets a statue near her hometown, carved by chain saw," 6 July 2019 Toile de Jouy, a house staple, was fashioned into zip-front jumpsuits and shorts with matching button-front shirts. — Roxanne Robinson, The Hollywood Reporter, "Inside the Red Carpet-Ready Dior Spring Men's Show," 22 June 2019 Cannabidiol oil, extracted from hemp seeds, has been fashioned into pills, infused lotions and other over-the-counter products. — Judith Kohler, The Denver Post, "Boulder company’s new 400,000-square-foot facility in Broomfield “will be the center of the CBD world”," 20 June 2019 Her hair was expertly fashioned to look like Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty. — Tatum Dooley, Teen Vogue, "From Kylie Jenner to Kiernan Shipka, Here's The Best Celebrity Style You Missed This Weekend," 17 June 2019 Obsidian, highly prized for its smooth finish, was fashioned in this room and used to create numerous objects, including mirrors. — National Geographic, "This Stone Age settlement took humanity's first steps toward city life," 26 Mar. 2019
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